Bronson Orthopedic Specialists - Marshall

Don’t put off the essential care you need because of COVID-19. We continue to safely schedule office appointments, surgeries and procedures so you can get the care you need now. Call your Bronson practice or a Bronson Care Advisor at (269) 341-7788 to schedule an office appointment or video visit with your provider.

Bronson Orthopedic Specialists - Marshall (A Bronson Battle Creek Hospital facility)

Bronson Orthopedic Specialists - Marshall (A Bronson Battle Creek Hospital facility)
212 Winston Drive
Marshall, MI 49068

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Hours of Operation

Office visits are by appointment only.

Main: (877) 704-3133
Fax: (269) 969-6283

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Specialty

  • Orthopedics

At Bronson Orthopedic Specialists, we believe in bringing out the best in people. It’s what we expect from ourselves, and it’s what we want for our patients.

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Treatment Options If Your Surgery Has Been Postponed

If your surgery has been postponed, learn about treatment options that may help lessen the pain.


Our professional team includes five of the most experienced and reputable orthopedic surgeons in the area, physician assistants, nurse practitioner and a friendly support staff to provide the very best orthopedic care in the region.

At Bronson Orthopedic Specialists, we truly care for our patients. Together, we can bring out the best in you.

Same Day Appointments

Bronson Orthopedic Specialists is offering same day orthopedic appointments, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Appointments must be made by calling (877) 704-3133. We are not able to accommodate walk-in appointments. 

Pioneers in Robotic-Assisted Knee Replacement

If you or a loved one has been experiencing knee pain that doesn't go away, it may be time for a partial or total knee replacement. Our experienced surgeons are the pioneers of robotic-assisted surgery in southwest Michigan, and have performed more than 1,000 partial and total knee replacements with this technology.

Robotic-assistance helps achieve precise position of the knee implant based on your body type and without exposure to radiation. It can help improve the function, feel and potential longevity of your new joint. Ask your doctor if robotic-assisted knee replacement is right for you.

Our Services

Bronson Orthopedic Specialists is known for unique expertise in all areas of orthopedic wellness. Our range of services include diagnostic, specialty programs and advanced surgical, interventional and treatment procedures including:

  • Anterior approach of the hip
  • Arthritis treatment
  • Arthroscopic assisted ligament reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic surgery
  • Bone and joint disease treatment
  • Carpal tunnel surgery – endoscopic & open
  • Fracture care and treatment
  • Hand surgery including fusions and tendon reconstructions
  • Hip resurfacing
  • Injections
  • Joint fluid therapies
  • Joint replacement surgery including hip, knee and shoulder
  • Patient specific implants
  • Robotics-assisted knee replacement
  • Sports injuries
  • Transplantation of knee cartilage
  • Work-related injuries

Other services include:

  • ACL and PCL reconstruction
  • Arthroscopic shoulder surgery
  • Autologous cartilage transplant (carticel transplant)
  • Endoscopic carpal tunnel surgery
  • Meniscal transplant
  • Shoulder replacement and shoulder resurfacing

Convenient Locations

We go the extra mile so you don’t have to. We have two locations in Battle Creek and one in Marshall. We are dedicated to providing healthcare services where you need it.

Sports Medicine & Athletic Training

Athletes of all levels deserve comprehensive, coordinated care to help them return to play more quickly and safely. Bronson Orthopedic Specialists physicians are watching out for our children and families even after office hours.

Southern_Michigan_Orthopaedics_Sports_Med_Athletic_Training

Why Choose Bronson Orthopedic Specialists for Sports Medicine & Athletic Training?

  • We cover several college and high school athletic programs year-round. 
  • We serve coaches and athletes at Battle Creek Central, Delton Kellogg, Gull Lake, Harper Creek, Lakeview and Union City high schools, as well as Kellogg Community College.

Conditions We Treat

  • Arthritis and joint pain
  • Cartilage injuries (such as meniscus)
  • Fractures
  • Hand, wrist and elbow injuries
  • Knee injuries
  • Ligament injuries (such as ACL tears)
  • Shoulder injuries
  • Tendonitis

For More Information About Sports Medicine Services

  • Contact us at (877) 704-3133. Our office hours are Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Helpful Links

Hip Replacement - Frequently Asked Questions

What is hip replacement? 

It is a metal and plastic covering for raw, arthritic bone ends. It replaces cartilage that has worn away over the years. Hip replacement can eliminate pain and allow you to move easily with less discomfort.

Who should have a hip replacement?  

When arthritis hip pain severely limits your ability to walk, work, or perform even simple activities, hip replacement may be considered.

Is there an alternative to hip replacement?

Hip replacement is only recommended after careful diagnosis of your joint problem. It is not likely that anti-inflammatory drugs or cortisone injections will give you the same long term relief that hip replacement will. 

Should my hip replacement be cemented? 

Hip replacements are successfully performed with all cemented components as well as with a combination of uncemented and cemented components. Your surgeon will discuss which technique is best for you.

How long is the hospital stay?

The average hospital stay for a hip replacement patient is around 3–5 days. In some cases, fixing one hip reduces the stress on the other hip, thus giving another two or three years if the arthritis is not too advanced. Each individual case is different.

How long is recuperation?

Recovery varies with each person. You will use a walker for approximately 4 weeks after the operation. You can drive a car in 2–4 weeks. Most people gradually increase their activities and play golf, doubles tennis, shuffleboard, or bowl in 12 weeks. More active sports, such as singles tennis and jogging are not recommended.

After discharge, there is usually no need for a nursing home. Some patients who live alone may require a short stay at a rehab center for a few days after they leave the hospital. This will depend on how you progress in the hospital, and keep in mind that healing and recovery times vary with each person.

What is the success rate?

Hip replacement surgery is recognized as a miracle of modern surgery. Most orthopedic experts consider hip replacement to be the best method of handling arthritis in the hip. Hip replacements have literally put hundreds of thousands of Americans back on their feet and allowed them to enjoy their golden years.

Are there complications?  

As with any surgery, there is a risk of complications after hip replacement surgery. However, they are quite rare… driving on an Interstate highway is probably more dangerous. To reduce the risk of infection, we take special precautionary measures in the operating room, and use powerful antibiotics. Our personnel are limited to fully trained and experienced nurses and technicians.

What about pain?

Thanks to advances in medication technology, we are able to keep you very comfortable after surgery. After surgery, any temporary discomfort does not compare to the pain of arthritis endured by most people in months and years before surgery.

And because hip replacement patients are not “sick,” you will not be treated as such. You will wear casual clothing after surgery, not hospital gowns. You’ll also join other joint replacement patients for buffet lunches, television, cards and games.

Knee Replacement - Frequently Asked Questions

What is knee replacement?  

It is a metal and plastic covering for raw, arthritic bone ends. It replaces cartilage that has worn away over the years. Knee replacement can eliminate pain and allow you to move easily with less discomfort. For those that have become bow-legged or knock-kneed over the years, it can also straighten your legs to a more natural position. 

Is there an alternative to knee replacement?  

Knee replacement is only recommended after careful diagnosis of your joint problem. Arthroscopic or microscopic surgery is not helpful once arthritis is advanced. Also, it is not likely that anti-inflammatory drugs or cortisone injections will give you the same long term relief that knee replacement will. 

Should my knee replacement be cemented?  

Knee replacements are successfully performed with all cemented components as well as with a combination of uncemented and cemented components. Your surgeon will discuss which technique is best for you.

How long is the hospital stay?  

The average hospital stay for a knee replacement patient is around 3–5 days. The average stay for two knees is 5–7 days. If both knees require replacement, it is usually best to have both done at the same time. That way, the total disability will be only slightly longer than the operation for one knee and the problem will be solved in the least amount of time.

In some cases, fixing one knee reduces the stress on the other knee, thus giving another two or three years if the arthritis is not too advanced. Each individual case is different. 

How long is recuperation?  

Recovery varies with each person. You will use a walker for approximately 4 weeks after the operation. You can drive a car in 2–4 weeks. Most people gradually increase their activities and play golf, doubles tennis, shuffleboard, or bowl in 12 weeks. More active sports, such as singles tennis and jogging are not recommended.

After discharge, there is usually no need for a nursing home. Some patients who live alone may require a short stay at a rehab center for a few days after they leave the hospital. This will depend on how you progress in the hospital, and keep in mind that healing and recovery times vary with each person. 

What is the success rate?

Knee replacement surgery is recognized as a miracle of modern surgery. Most orthopedic experts consider replacement to be the best method of handling arthritis in the knee. Knee replacements have literally put hundreds of thousands of Americans back on their feet and allowed them to enjoy their golden years.

Osteoarthritis - Frequently Asked Questions

What is osteoarthritis?  

Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is also called degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear” arthritis. Almost everyone is affected by it to some extent as they grow older. It most frequently occurs in weight-bearing joints, mainly knees, hips, and ankles. This form of arthritis slowly and gradually breaks down the cartilage that covers the ends of each bone in a joint. Normally, cartilage acts as a shock absorber, providing a smooth surface between the bones. But with osteoarthritis, the smooth surface becomes rough and pitted. In advanced stages, it may wear away completely. Without their normal gliding surfaces, the bones grind against one another, causing inflammation, pain and restricted movement. Bone spurs may form. 

What are the symptoms of osteoarthritis?  

The number one symptom is pain. The pain is caused by irritation and pressure on nerve endings as well as muscle tension and fatigue. The pain can progress from mild soreness and aching with movement to severe pain, even when resting. The second symptom is loss of easy movement, such as bending or rising normally. Morning stiffness is a problem for many people. This lack of mobility, in turn, often causes the muscles serving the knee or hip to weaken, and overall body coordination suffers. 

How is osteoarthritis diagnosed?  

A simple weight-bearing x-ray and examination by a skilled orthopedic doctor will determine if you have osteoarthritis. Time-consuming and costly diagnostic procedures are not required. 

What is the treatment for osteoarthritis?  

There is no cure for arthritis, but the past decade has seen dramatic new ways to manage the pain, lack of mobility, and fatigue that are among its most disabling symptoms.

Hyaluronate – The new treatment lubricates the knees and can reduce pain for 9–12 months. It’s the first major breakthrough in 20 years for arthritis knee pain. Hyalgan is the brand name, and five injections are given into the knee one week apart.

Medicines – Coated aspirin helps relieve pain and has few side effects. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as Voltaren, Feldene, Naprosyn, and Clinoril, are prescription drugs for pain and inflammations. Do not take aspirin if you are taking NSAIDS.

Cortisone Shots – Cortisone shots are given for inflammation. For many people, joint arthritis is often made symptom-free for months or even years after cortisone shots. Four to six shots a year can be given without any dangerous side effects.

Diet – There is no evidence that any specific foods will prevent or relieve arthritis symptoms. It’s important to keep thin, however, because excess weight aggravates arthritis by putting added pressure on the knee and hip.

Exercise and Rest – Prolonged rest and days of inactivity will increase stiffness and make it harder to move around. Motion is lotion for arthritis! At the same time, excessive or improper exercise can overwork your arthritic joint and cause further damage. A balanced routine of rest and exercise is best.

What about surgery?

There are two options employed for surgery:

Arthroscopy – Arthroscopic procedures are not generally helpful for arthritis. In some cases, a “flap” of torn knee cartilage can aggravate arthritis and cause additional pain. The cartilage flap can be removed by arthroscopy.

Knee or Hip Replacement – Knee replacement or hip replacement may be a very positive solution to the pain and disability of advanced osteoarthritis. The rough, worn surfaces of the joint are relined with smooth-surfaced metal and plastic components.

Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome - Frequently Asked Questions

What is Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome?

Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is a condition of the kneecap characterized by a rough or soft spot on its cartilage surface. In the past, it has been called chondromalacia patella, runner’s knee, or dashboard knee.

What are the symptoms of PFPS?  

It causes pain, giving way, stiffness and a feeling of catching or grinding. Going up and down stairs is a bit difficult, and sitting with your knees bent or squatting is very uncomfortable. It makes the knee “give out,” grind, or pop loudly. 

Who gets PFPS?  

Many people may have PFPS, but only about 10 percent have a long-lasting pain or disability because of it — a fact not clearly understood by the medical profession. Over-activity, excess weight and injury sometimes initiate the symptoms. This condition is often seen in adolescents, manual laborers and athletes. 

How is PFPS diagnosed?  

Cartilage contains no calcium and, as a result, cannot be seen by ordinary x-rays. A patient’s history and a physical examination suggest the diagnosis. If there is any doubt, we will suggest arthroscopy to look behind the kneecap and check to see that there is no other injury or abnormality. 

How long does PFPS last?  

It may last several months, but fortunately, is usually a self-limiting problem. If you are born with an abnormal kneecap, it may last indefinitely. You may even need an operation to correct it, though this is unusual. 

What is the treatment for PFPS?  

Small doses of anti-inflammatory medicines can often decrease swelling, stiffness and pain. Other treatments may include injections, ice, rest, and physical therapy. Taping and a brace to stabilize the kneecap also can be helpful. The good news is that although PFPS can be uncomfortable, usually it is only a short term nuisance and inconvenience. It also generally does not lead to arthritis or any other joint condition.

Patient Forms

Shoulder - Frequently Asked Questions

Who gets shoulder problems?  

After age 25, most problems are caused by the effect of repeated overhead motions for a long period of time. Weekend athletes and do-it-yourselfers are especially vulnerable to overuse problems in the shoulder. The leading causes of shoulder pain are bursitis, tendonitis, and irritated rotator cuff. This group of conditions is called shoulder impingement syndrome.

What is bursitis?  

The bursa is a fluid-filled sac that cushions the rotator cuff tendons from the shoulder bone. An irritated bursa is caused by an inflamed rotator cuff. When irritated, the bursa produces extra fluid, the sac expands, and the pressure creates pain. 

What is tendonitis?  

Deep in the shoulder are a group of tendons and muscles called a rotator cuff. They help stabilize the upper arm bone in the shoulder joint and rotate the arm. The biceps tendon is also present in front of the shoulder. When the arm is raised repeatedly over the head, the tendons rub against the underside of the shoulder bone and become irritated. The tendons swell, leaving even less space between tendons and bone. The irritation creates more irritation. It is much like a rope being drawn again and again across a craggy rock. 

What is an irritated rotator cuff?  

Excessive wear on the rotator cuff can lead to severe irritation, roughening, and eventually ulceration and tearing of the cuff. An irritated rotator cuff is felt as a clicking or popping in the shoulder from a ragged piece of the cuff sliding under the shoulder bone, and arm weakness. Occasionally, injuries or infections can all lead to arthritis, although arthritis of the shoulder is less common than in the knee or hip. Arthritis in the shoulder causes a roughening of the joint from worn cartilage and loose fragments of bone. 

What are the symptoms?  

Bursitis, tendonitis, irritated rotator cuff and arthritis are all inflammatory reactions to overuse. With any of these problems, a continuous dull ache in the shoulder can become a sharp pain when you try to move your arm, especially over your head. The pain may be worse at night after a heavy day of activities using your shoulder.

What is the treatment for shoulder impingement?

Rest – Avoid strenuous activity and any motion that causes pain. In some cases a shoulder sling is helpful to rest fatigued muscles and inflamed tendons.

Ice – An ice pack on the affected shoulder can help ease inflammation when combined with gentle motion.

Oral Medicines – Anti-inflammatory medicines such as Motrin, Feldene, Voltaren, Naprosyn or aspirin will help reduce inflammation.

Cortisone Injections – Cortisone is a natural hormone and a very powerful medicine for inflammation. When injected directly into the inflamed area, it can be effective in decreasing swelling and inflammation that cause pain.

How can physical therapy help?  

Once the pain and inflammation are under control, a program of exercise, ice, heat, electrical stimulation, ultrasound and massage is used to help you regain motion. 

When is surgery helpful?  

Thanks to recent advances in arthroscopy, many shoulder problems can be corrected using the same techniques that revolutionized the treatment of knee problems. Arthroscopy is an outpatient procedure requiring three tiny incisions closed with one stitch each. This procedure allows the surgeon to see and work inside the shoulder joint.

Problems that can be treated through arthroscopy include:

  • Impingement syndrome
  • Irritated rotator
  • Torn cartilage
  • Unstable joint

In some cases, however, if the rotator cuff is severely damaged and leads to arthritis, the only option for pain-free motion is a shoulder replacement. Shoulder replacement requires a 1-2 day hospital stay.

What Kind of Anesthesia is Used?

For maximum comfort, general anesthesia is preferred. Regional anesthesia is an option for some patients. Your surgeon will discuss which type is best for you. 

How Long Does it Take?  

Shoulder arthroscopies are performed as an outpatient procedure. The time from check-in to discharge usually is as little as two hours. Many people return to their normal activities within four to five days. People with physically demanding jobs can usually return to work in two to three weeks.

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